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Software Compliance Audits are Manifestly Unreasonable

Software Compliance Audits on demand are nothing new, they have been around since 1991 when it comes to PC software installations.  The audit is initiated by either the software vendor in its own right through their legal counsel, or a member organization such as the Business Software Alliance (BSA), Software Information and Industry Association (SIIA) or the Federation Against Software Theft (FAST).

Stating the obvious, most of these software audits are all about generating additional license revenue for the software vendor and/or “naming and shaming the victims”!

What PCProfile finds as astounding, is that since 1991 nothing has been done by the software OEM vendors to make it easier for the organization that has been targeted for a software audit, in terms of “accurately identifying” what has been installed by the software vendors with their applications.

Why Succumb to an Audit?

Why should you succumb to an audit if the outcome is “lengthy and confrontational discussions with vendors due to the complexity and misunderstanding around product use rights and license metrics”  that are no fault of your own. The issues cited are predominantly due to lack of data from the software vendor in the first place, coupled with complex, hard to understand license conditions!

It’s manifestly unreasonable to expect an organization to come up with a list of software applications, “on demand”, based on what has been installed at the “audit effective date” which will typically be a date selected, in arrears, by the vendor.

It’s manifestly unreasonable to expect an organization to validate that list of applications, if there has never been any declaration from the date of installation about what has been installed, what files are associated with what applications, and what the license terms and conditions are relative to the installation.

It’s absolutely impossible to verify what fonts (that are also subject to licensing) have been installed, when they were installed and what fonts are associated with which application and what the license terms and conditions are for these fonts, relative to the applications installed

Why don't software packs that are being installed, come with a list of all files, showing which files are associated or bound to the application? It's not that hard, or is there some ulterior motive by the software industry?

How can you make the Software Vendors Accountable?

Read more at;  It's Manifestly Unreasonable